The Band List

Here it is, the final musical entertainment list for the Cincinnati Street Food Festival! These fantastic artists and groups, assembled by The Greenwich (2442 Gilbert Ave), will be playing the main stage all day long in the order listed below. It all happens Saturday, October 12th, on McMillan St. at Stanton Ave. in Walnut Hills and it’s completely free! Don’t let you or your friends and neighbors miss this rare collection of incredible Cincinnati musicians pass you by. Come to grab a bite to eat and enjoy the shows!

DJ Fly Troy (MC) [Walnut Hills resident!]
Tim Caudill (Folk/Americana) [Walnut Hills resident!]
Green Street (Jazz)
Baba Miller (Percussionist) [Walnut Hills resident!]
Sidewalk Soundtrack Project (Blues, Jazz, Pop)
Tracy Walker (Folk, Blues)
Jameze Latrail (Neo-Soul)
Sonny Moorman (Blues)
Ingrid Rachel Project (R&B, Pop)

Your input is needed for Walnut Hills’ future

We are getting closer and closer to adopting form-based code as the law of the land here in Walnut Hills! BUT there is still one last piece of community engagement that needs to be completed and we need your participation! Remember the ‘regulating plan’ that was created at the neighborhood design workshop last October which laid out how the neighborhood business district and surrounding areas will be re-zoned? (View the 29mb PDF here). Well, we want YOUR INPUT on the plan before sending it to City Council. Here’s what you need to do:

Show up on September 12th to the Walnut Hills Area Council meeting at the The Bush Recreation Center (2640 Kemper Lane) at 6:30pm. City Planners will give a brief presentation and then we will all break into groups to discuss the new zoning code! If you can’t make it right at 6:30pm no problem! Feel free to come anytime between 6:30-8pm.


We promise that all of our hard work is close to paying off and that we will soon stop ‘bugging’ you about form-based code 🙂 Join us for one last input session!

Join us for the 2013 Cincinnati Street Food Festival!

This summer has been packed with fun events, but the fun doesn’t have to end just because the calendar shifted. We’re gearing up for the second annual Cincinnati Street Food Festival – and we want you to be a part of it! And there are a lot of ways to be involved:
 
Check out our Indiegogo Campaign. The Cincinnati Street Food Fest is brought together by people with a ton of heart and not so much money. Giving $5, $10, $50 gets us that much closer to making the Street Food Fest as awesome as it can possibly be. Plus, every dollar donated up to $2500 will be matched by the Haile Foundation. So you double down on your generosity and get some sweet perks like a t-shirt and stickers! Right now we have a goal of $5,000. Help us burst that goal-o-meter! Click here for our Indiegogo page.
 
Volunteer at the fest! There’s a lot to be done the day of the Cincinnati Street Food Festival. From set-up to clean up and every little thing in between. And we need your help! We’ve got jobs suited for all abilities. Volunteers score a fabulous CSFF volunteer shirt – in addition to a sense of good will and bragging rights, of course. Check out our volunteer form here.
 

Tell the world! Tweet about it, invite your friends to the Facebook event, email your coworkers, text your basketball group, shout it from the rooftops! This is our chance to invite our friends from across Cincinnati to our beautiful, diverse, historic neighborhood so we can all celebrate and enjoy the many great things about living in Cincinnati. Don’t let anyone miss out on the fun!

 

For more info, check out the main event page: www.cincystreetfoodfest.com

Talking Form-Based Code with Vice-Mayor Qualls

Our Executive Director, Kevin Wright, joined Vice-Mayor Roxanne Qualls yesterday on WVXU‘s Cincinnati Edition to discuss the City’s new Form-Based code implementation and how the new code impacts our neighborhoods! Walnut Hills is one of four pilot neighborhoods in Cincinnati that volunteered to adopt this new type of zoning, and we’re very excited about the opportunities it will provide

According to Vice-Mayor Qualls, the Form-Based code “specifies proportion and relationship to the street and to other buildings. People are choosing more and more to live in our neighborhoods because they want an urban experience and we know the value of the architecture and the original urban form of our communities. Form-based codes respect that and it actually allows for new development that is also respectful of that original urban form.”

Qualls adds that the new code “makes things very clear to developers what they can do in a specific neighborhood. You should be able to get all your approvals in a very short amount of time.”

In the case of Walnut Hills, Kevin Wright states that it “allowed the community to create a vision for their business district and how they want it designed. We took that vision and are attaching a zoning code to it.”

According to Wright, the new code system “creates a win-win-win for community, the City and the developer”. “When we visited Nashville”, he continues, “some developers even admitted being skeptical at the beginning, but once they started developing under the code and saw that the form based code was much easier to use than conventional zoning…developers loved it.”

Click below to listen to the full interview: